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Thursday, October 30, 2008

Metallix - From 2003


The newly formed Future Comics has a couple of very positive things going for it. First, it's run by long-time comics professionals who have experience in the business, and who know what makes a good comics story. The second positive thing? A comic called Metallix.

Written by David Michelinie, and drawn by Ron Lim, Metallix chronicles the adventures of a team of "industrial troubleshooters," who all share one suit of armor, made from a liquid metal substance called "Metal X." The suit augments the natural abilities of each wearer, making an acrobat more agile, a martial artist more formidable, a marksman a better shot, and...well, you get the idea.

The book's art chores are well handled by penciller Lim, who excels at high-octane action stories, as well as characterization and expression. Having his work inked by comic veteran Bob Layton (who also co-plots) only sweetens the deal, as Layton tends to bring a polished "smoothness" to any pencils he goes over.

The two make a great team, indeed. Michelinie does a great job of fleshing out characters, as the beginning of major conflicts and possible storylines can be seen from issue one. Much of the conflict comes from the sharing of the suit, itself. It could safely be predicted that how to decide whose "turn" it is to don Metal X could quickly become a hot issue. These are not "cookie-cutter" characters, as it seems each has their own motivations and bold personalities.



The format of the comic is also appealing, as each issue features a back-up story dealing with the origin of the Metallix suit. The one thing the book has going against it, however, is the price. Three dollars and fifty cents for approximately ten to fifteen minutes of reading enjoyment is, to say the least, a bit steep.

Metallix is suggested for those who enjoy action-oriented super hero fun. Find it at comic shops, comic conventions, or by logging on to www.futurecomicsonline.com. Metallix is published by Future Comics, 32 pages, $3.50.

Review by Mark Allen